Diagnostic Imaging Services

State-of-the-art diagnostic imaging

JFK CT 2016_sm
JFK Memorial Hospital’s new Aquilion Prime 160 CT Scanner takes up to 160 image slices in one rotation at a low dose of radiation. These views are then manipulated on a computer to produce three-dimensional images that are more detailed than conventional X-ray images.

 

Computed Tomography

Computed tomography, or CT scan, was introduced more than 40 years ago to help physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Since then, CT scans have rapidly improved in speed and resolution, providing clear, detailed images of internal organs. 

These images provided by the painless, non-invasive scan, opens up opportunities to save lives, time and money through the early detection of cancer, internal injuries and infections. The scan also helps physicians appropriately treat patients while avoiding unnecessary hospitalization and testing.

A CT scan consists of a movable table that glides through an X-ray generating device that circles the body. Cross-sectional images are created of the organ being studied – similar to slices from a loaf of bread. Advanced CT scan technology, such as The Aquilion Prime 160, takes up to 160 image slices in one rotation at a low dose of radiation.
These views are then manipulated on a computer to produce three-dimensional images that are more detailed than conventional X-ray images. If necessary, a dye may be injected in the area being studied to improve the clarity of the images.

The entire scanning process, including exam preparation and administration of the dye, takes approximately one hour. The scan itself may last only a few seconds. Patients can return to normal activities after the scan.

The scan is not recommended for women who may be pregnant and for people with certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, due to risk of an allergic reaction to the injected dye.

If the past is any indication, CT scans will continue to play a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of health problems.

Imaging options including an MRI, CT scan, ultrasound, X-ray, biopsy, mammography and bone densitometry.